Seeing People for Who They Can Become

Thu, Apr 28, 2011

Influence, Perspective

Seeing People for Who They Can Become

Sometimes it’s easy to be blinded by the past and even the present…

…to fall into the trap of seeing someone for who they were or who we think they are instead of who they are becoming.

If we aren’t careful we can unintentionally limit their potential by not being supportive when they have failed, when they have messed up or when they are attempting to change their ways.

It’s not just about when someone has done wrong either.

Sometimes we take them for granted too, don’t we?

Perhaps we don’t listen to ideas from that young intern who has audacious dreams but no real grasp of reality (at least the reality we like to think we’ve gained via experience). What does he or she know anyways?

Or maybe it’s the staff member who has worked with your organization for 15 years who doesn’t get handed opportunities any more… because, well, they never really contributed anything stellar in the past.

This is what happens when we don’t look at people through the eyes of potential. It’s the danger that lurks when we see them for something other than what they can be.

Every day we have a choice to help bring something great out of others or to overlook them, discount them or be so focused on our own gain that we simply roll right past them.

I think the choice is apparent and one we must consciously make.

I don’t know about you but for me, I don’t want to miss out on the chance to help someone become who they were meant to be.


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    About Daniel Decker:

    Daniel Decker is President of Higher Level Group, Inc., a strategic marketing and development firm that helps authors, professional speakers, and organizations who are doing good to expand their influence. LINKS: Follow @DanielDecker on Twitter | Visit the "About" Page | Subscribe to the Blog and get updates via RSS or Email.

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    • http://www.fxexchangerate.com/ fxgeorges

      Humility is the beginning of knowledge.

      If you say that you know nothing about the fauna of Egypt but would like to know about it, you are on your way to gaining knowledge. You will feed your mind and you will be grateful for that knowledge and you will seek more knowledge.

      If you say that you know nothing about a subject and you have no desire to learn more because you are afraid that you might not understand the knowledge you receive, you will be miserable if you don’t even try to gain such knowledge. You are “suffering” from low esteem not humility. A humble person says that one will do the best one can to learn.